Vintage 1950s Motorola TV Serving Trays, Sold Along with Motorola Televisions in Dealer Stores, Just What Was Needed When Serving Those Delicious Frozen Swanson and Banquet TV Dinners in Their Aluminum Trays

Somehow these shows actually made it to television.

Sometimes you see things that are spoof what kids cartoons were like in the past. They seem ridiculous, like they could never had been on television. Well, most of the time they kinda were.

The Super 6 - (1968)



The Super 6 were not a traditional team, like the Mighty Heroes were, rather they were all part of Super Service, a super hero agency where trouble calls were received.

The Chief, would take the calls in his dispatcher's booth and send the most appropriate, or in Super Bwoing's case available, hero out on the job. Our six headliners were not the only members of Super Service. Though they rarely took part in the stories, many other super hero types were frequently seen in the Super Service offices, waiting around for assignments.

Super President - (1968)



Yup, Super President. The President James Norcross is given superpowers as the result of a cosmic storm. The President now has increased strength and morphing abilities.

But the best part is the way he runs :36 seconds into the video. :)

The show was canceled midway through its second season on NBC because critics and TV watchdog groups had issues with its depiction of a national leader who was an invincible superhuman.

Misterjaw - (1976)


The primary goal of Misterjaw and Catfish was to catch Harry Halibut. The duo were pursued by Fearless Freddy the Shark Hunter.

The cartoon, believe it or not, was created to cash in on the popularity of the Jaws movie that had just come out.

The Barkleys - (1972)


The Barkleys was the Saturday morning cartoon version of All in the Family...except they were dogs.

if Arnie Barkley's voice sounds familiar, it’s Henry Corden. He was the voice of Fred Flintstone after Alan Reed, who originally voiced Flintstone, died in 1973.

Bailey's Comets - (1973)



Bailey's Comets is pretty much an animated Roller Derby race around the globe.

Here Comes the Grump (1969)


The main character in Here Comes the Grump was a small, grumpy wizard who put a spell of melancholy on the kingdom of the Princess Dawn. The Princess and her friend Terry Dexter (a boy from the "real" world) searched for the Cave of the Whispering Orchids to find a crystal key to break the spell, while the Grump tried to stop them.

A recurring gag was that at the very last minute when the Grump was about to catch up with Princess Dawn, the Dragon would sneeze and burn the little wizard.

Tijuana Toads - (1969)


The series was about two toads, Toro and Pancho, who live in the Mexican city of Tijuana. Throughout the cartoon they try to eat their prey, but always get out-smarted. They would sometimes themselves be targeted by a bird, Crazylegs Crane, and would in turn always out-smart him.

When series began airing in 1976 as part of The Pink Panther Show, NBC redubbed Tijuana Toads and renamed it Texas Toads to make the series “less offensive”. A laugh track was added to the new soundtrack, and the toads were given the new names of Fatso and Banjo.

A List Of Hard To Believe Saturday Morning Cartoons

Somehow these shows actually made it to television. Sometimes you see things that are spoof what kids cartoons were like in the past. Th...
Show title card

Moments from the electric company I still remember to this day.

Electric Company was essentially like SNL for children. For most of my generation it was our first introduction to guys like Mel Brooks and Morgan Freeman. Ah, back in the days back when stoners wrote "children's TV" without irony, just fun.

Spider-man meets the wall


Spider-Man fought one of his oldest arch-enemies... THE WALL?!? That's right, The Wall.
I liked how spider-man didn’t speak on these segments.

Vincent the Vegetable Vampire


Morgan Freeman's vampire character goes vegetarian.

Love of Chair


More about pants really. But still bizarre

Easy Reader Song


Morgan Freeman and Rita Moreno get their song on. A similar tune was used later as "One Word Comes After Another", with the same basic concept.

Electric Company Shadowbox


And of course the classic shadowbox segment where they pronounce words together.

Moments from The Electric Company I still remember to this day

Moments from the electric company I still remember to this day. Electric Company was essentially like SNL for children. For most of my ...
Promo Photo

Sometimes movies get a product placement. This one shows how it was possible to work Chuck tailor shoes into the mix.



So basically the plot of the movie Big Girls Don't Cry... They Get Even (aka Stepkids) is this.

Laura is frustrated with the antics and carrying on of her extended family..

Big Girls Don't Cry... They Get Even opens with clips of home videos shown by 13-year old Laura Chartoff (Hillary Wolf) the film's narrator and main character, which she uses to describe her family and their complicated relationships.

Laura's artist father David (Griffin Dunne) has had a number of relationships since his divorce from Melinda, including a marriage to Barbara (Patricia Kalember) which produced
another step sister named Jessie (Jessica Seely), and currently is living in San Francisco with 19-year-old Stephanie (Adrienne Shelly) who is pregnant with twins.

In other words, a girl fed up with her quirky, dysfunctional family runs away from home, causing all of them to spend time with each other.

Most people's memory of this movie is not watching the movie itself, but that it was one of the previews before the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle movie on VHS.

Movie Cover
There is tons of music in the movie including: 


There's even a site that documents the product placement technique used to showcase Chuck Tailor shoes.

via - chucksconnection.com: "Throughout the film, Hillary Wolf, in her lead role as Laura, wears black high top chucks and Dan Futterman, in his role as Josh, wears natural white high tops. 

After 90 minutes of dysfunctional family, it's fitting that the coolest characters in the film wear chucks. There are many good shots of Laura in different sections of the film, and several with Josh. but the best sequence of shots is right at the beginning when we see Laura hanging around her Los Angeles house talking on the telephone or writing in her diary."

Big Girls Don't Cry... They Get Even - Trailer. You know, from the Ninja Turtles VHS Tape

Sometimes movies get a product placement. This one shows how it was possible to work Chuck tailor shoes into the mix. So basica...

Proving what you know is true. It never hurts to ask!

This production of Julius Caesar got the idea to contact Marvel comics to ask for help. And what they got was probably over and beyond what they were looking for.

Via - The Kirby Museum: "In 1969, Sheldon Feldner contacted Marvel Comics, asking if one of Marvel’s artists would be interested in designing costumes for a production of William Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar by the University Theatre Company at Santa Cruz at the newly-built Cowell College of the University of California at Santa Cruz.

As luck would have it, the Kirby family had recently moved to California, and Stan Lee recommended that Feldner contact Jack Kirby. Kirby designed the costumes and provided a drawing that was used on posters, handbills and programs at no cost to the students."

Here are a few costume test shots.



Later on a lot of these costumes were used in the comic series The New Gods for DC Comics in 1971. Which launched the land of Apokolips, a nightmarish, ruined dystopia filled with machinery and fire pits and is ruled by the tyrant Darkseid.

The collected version of The New Gods is available on Amazon.


Jack Kirby created Julius Caesar Costume Designs for a College - 1969

Proving what you know is true. It never hurts to ask! This production of Julius Caesar got the idea to contact Marvel comics to ask for...

 

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